Copy of the statutes of the Order of the Garter in English, written probably in 1558, containing the statutes of Henry VIII, and of Mary and Philip, and a further statute, dated 12th of January in the first year of Elizabeth, added in another hand. Edit

Summary

Identifier
Adv.MS.31.7.18

Dates

  • 1558. (Creation)

Extents

  • 0.00 linear metres (Whole)
    ii + 26 folios. Quarto.

Subjects

Notes

  • Scope and Contents

    The title, and the statutes of Henry VIII, are introduced by small gold initials within blue and brown parti-coloured squares. Many of the statutes of Henry VIII, and most of those of Mary and Philip have a title or a summary in red in the margin, written in the same hand as the text; several have marginal annotations in another hand of the late 16th or early 17th century. All the statutes, except that of Elizabeth, have been numbered, and at folios i-ii is a list of contents, written in a contemporary calligraphic hand, referring to this numeration, as well as to the foliation, which is original on folios 1-23. With catchwords at folios 8 verso and 16 verso.

  • Arrangement

    Collation: 1² (-2), 2-3⁸, 4⁶, 5⁴.

  • Related Materials

    For statutes in French, see Adv.MS.32.6.9, folios 49-57, Ch.A.43, and MS.7143; for statutes in English see Adv.MS.32.6.9, folios 1-17.

  • Physical Characteristics and Technical Requirements

    Vellum. Bound in a contemporary or near contemporary cover, which bears a small 19th century decoration both front and back.

  • Immediate Source of Acquisition

    Presented, 1925, by the Faculty of Advocates to the nation on the foundation of the National Library of Scotland.

  • Custodial History

    It is not known for whom this copy was made, but it came into the possession of John, Baron Lumley (whose name, in the hand of a secretary, appears at folio i), sometime during the 2nd half of the 16th century. Afterwards it was owned by Sir James Balfour of Denmilne, Lyon King of Arms, whose inscription, dated 1630, is at folio 1. Denmilne number 13. It was bought by the Advocates’ Library in 1698.

Components